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Arugula/Rucola Selvatica-Wild Arugula (115-5)

$3.50

Arugula Selvatica means Wild Arugula. Compared to Cultivated Arugula, it is slower growing, ready in about 50 days, with more deeply lobed leaves and a more pungent flavor. This is the type of Arugula (also called Rucola or Rocket) that grows wild in the countryside around Rome. Seeds of Arugula selvatica are much smaller than Arugula Coltivata seeds, so the packet weight is smaller but still contains a similar number of seeds. Arugula selvatica has 3,000 seeds per gram. Our 3-gram packet is about 9,000 seeds.

Arugula has been grown since Roman times, reputedly as an aphrodisiac, and is used widely in Italian cuisine. It's great as a salad ingredient, or simply eaten alone with a sprinkle of salt and a drizzle of olive oil. In Italy, it is often wilted over hot pizza or in pasta just before serving. Ischia, an island in the Bay of Naples, has a traditional digestif liqueur made from arugula, called rucolino. Arugula pesto is made just like basil pesto, and is a good substitute when the weather is too cold for basil. Arugula survives low temperatures and is usually the first and last salad green in the garden. Under row cover, it will survive all but the coldest winters.

Sprinkle seeds about an inch apart. Replant frequently for a long season of harvest. Our huge packets provide plenty of seed! 

 

To see our growing guide for arugula, click here.

 

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Description

Arugula Selvatica means Wild Arugula. Compared to Cultivated Arugula, it is slower growing, ready in about 50 days, with more deeply lobed leaves and a more pungent flavor. This is the type of Arugula (also called Rucola or Rocket) that grows wild in the countryside around Rome. Seeds of Arugula selvatica are much smaller than Arugula Coltivata seeds, so the packet weight is smaller but still contains a similar number of seeds. Arugula selvatica has 3,000 seeds per gram. Our 3-gram packet is about 9,000 seeds.

Arugula has been grown since Roman times, reputedly as an aphrodisiac, and is used widely in Italian cuisine. It's great as a salad ingredient, or simply eaten alone with a sprinkle of salt and a drizzle of olive oil. In Italy, it is often wilted over hot pizza or in pasta just before serving. Ischia, an island in the Bay of Naples, has a traditional digestif liqueur made from arugula, called rucolino. Arugula pesto is made just like basil pesto, and is a good substitute when the weather is too cold for basil. Arugula survives low temperatures and is usually the first and last salad green in the garden. Under row cover, it will survive all but the coldest winters.

Sprinkle seeds about an inch apart. Replant frequently for a long season of harvest. Our huge packets provide plenty of seed! 

 

To see our growing guide for arugula, click here.

 

Reviews (5)

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I'm dissapointed. They are not growing as well as they should. The leaves never grew more than 2 ". I will try again growing another patch.
Posted by Jackie R on 16th Mar 2020

Loved this arugula, came up faster than predicted, kept growing despite funky weather here in Oregon. It continues to come up in succession planting with as much vigor as the first batch.
Posted by undefined on 28th Jun 2017

Here it is late November in Nova Scotia and I will be cutting Selvatica Rucola (arugula) for Sat. night pizza. This is one of many plantings since spring. This variety can not be be beat for both flavour and abundance. I got a lot of subsequent harvest from each planting, my farmers market customers loved it to, judging by how many bags they often bought. Deborah
Posted by Deborah Hayward on 21st Nov 2014