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Bean Yard Long Stringa a Grano Bruno (57-31)

$8.10

Yard Long Bean. This bean is very popular in Italy. Sets a long, slim and crisp bean with good taste. It needs warm weather, so do not seed until soil has warmed up well, around the same time you would set out tomatoes or a week or so after the last frost date. A vigorous grower, it needs support so use tripods, poles or trellis. Plant  3-4 seeds around the base of each pole and thin to one. For a trellis, plant 2 seeds every six inches and thin to one. Keep picking to encourage production. 80 days to maturity on average. Pole beans have approximately 1 seed per gram.

To see our growing guide for beans, click here.

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Yard Long Bean. This bean is very popular in Italy. Sets a long, slim and crisp bean with good taste. It needs warm weather, so do not seed until soil has warmed up well, around the same time you would set out tomatoes or a week or so after the last frost date. A vigorous grower, it needs support so use tripods, poles or trellis. Plant  3-4 seeds around the base of each pole and thin to one. For a trellis, plant 2 seeds every six inches and thin to one. Keep picking to encourage production. 80 days to maturity on average. Pole beans have approximately 1 seed per gram.

To see our growing guide for beans, click here.

Reviews (3)

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These beans remind me of summer and my grandfather and great uncle. They both came from Bari and would grow these beans. We would have them with a light tomato sauce and spaghetti. Last year I made them with the Supermarzanos and Linguine Fini from Barilla. I have raised beds - each year I amend with compost and bags of new soil. I also mix in a timed release dry fertilizer. I soak the beans over night in water I plant in a line I put two beans in each hole I space each bean 1.5’ apart When the beans are tall enough to send out their tendrils - I put long poles spaced evenly and help the beans to grow up the pole. They are very easy to grow, but once they start coming you need to stay on top of them and not let them get too big to where you can see the seeds. You want them the size of a Harricot Vert.
Posted by Gloria on 17th Jul 2019

So far, so good. Not every seed germinated, but over 50% did and the plants are going well. I don't have any beans yet and it will probably be another month, but I'm happy so far
Posted by undefined on 23rd Jul 2017

My family and I have exclusively been growing this bean for approx. 15+years. The reason why it's still in our garden after all of these years is because, for the same effort of growing any other "common bean" you get waaaaaaaaay more production/flavor. They are such a pleasure to grow and we literally "drool with anticipation" ha,ha,ha over the first beans to be seen in the garden! Our favorite way to eat them is, lightly cooked with butter and garlic. But they are just as tasty without and can hold their own in the flavor department! From a survival/self reliance standpoint they are most excellent due to the fact that they are easily dehydrated, simply storing in food grade buckets as you get a lot of healthy food easily stored away for emergencies, winter use... So in fact they can also be called a very GREEN bean... no need to process via electricity when you can string them up to dry. Ours have been growing in the Midwest USA Region quite successfully, and some strains are cold hardier than others (that is the one we grow Orient Wonder). This one on SOI isn't strain/variety specific? We haven't grown the Seeds Of Italy Yard Long Bean seeds ourselves, but I can guarantee that you definitely won't regret it!!! : )
Posted by Backwoods Garden-a-holic on 9th Jan 2015