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Radicchio di Castelfranco (40-5)

$3.50

Radicchio di Castelfranco. Round crunchy closed head. Variegated with beautiful red & light green markings. Lovely in the salad bowl. Fall planting is best for full-size plant, anytime for baby. If planting in the spring, use transplants so as to be able to harvest before full heat of summer. This is easy to grow and very consistent in producing a nice head. 9 gram packet, approx. 5,400 seeds.

To see our growing guide for chicory and radicchio, click here.

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Radicchio di Castelfranco. Round crunchy closed head. Variegated with beautiful red & light green markings. Lovely in the salad bowl. Fall planting is best for full-size plant, anytime for baby. If planting in the spring, use transplants so as to be able to harvest before full heat of summer. This is easy to grow and very consistent in producing a nice head. 9 gram packet, approx. 5,400 seeds.

To see our growing guide for chicory and radicchio, click here.

Reviews (5)

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It grows well in Southern California. I take off the outer leaves and thinly slice the inner leaves. Then heat a lttle evoo in a large frying pan, dump in all the radicchio and turn it in the pan until it reduces. Then cover and simmer for 10 to 15 minutes. An excellent side dish. This radicchio is less bitter than most. I've read that it is a cross between red radicchio and Batavian endive.
Posted by Grace Blumberg on 28th Nov 2016

We started seedlings in late summer last year for a fall crop which survived the season ending drought with a little help from drip tape and mulch. The plants took hot, dry weather and then a cool, dry fall. They grew beautifully and survived until thanksgiving. We started eating them when they were small and by the end of the season they were football size!
Posted by Ann on 27th Mar 2014

This one has to be the most beautiful. I grow allot of winter crops, the northwest has a great climate for them. I use this in salad blends and its like little jewels in the greens. Many are unfamiliar with this family of greens, but that was the same for arugula years ago. If ever there was a breakout italian green this would be it. Each head will have a different variation on the creamy leaves with splashes of red. One of my favorite winter salads has this radicchio and a red grapefruit. Plant in late summer or fall for winter harvest. Leave the roots in the ground and they will sprout new leaves in spring.
Posted by Maureen Wall on 27th Mar 2014